2015

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2 startlingly simple tips to prevent and recover from poisonous software (malware) on your phones and such!

Posted on November 23, 2015 in hntbh - 0 comments - 0
malwareIn a galaxy far far away …
Android and Apple devices (yes that precious iPad too) can be victims to poisonous software (“malware”) that can invade our personal lives. Malware can…
  • Take pictures and videos at will and post them on the internet (but it is ok, because you are never are with your phone in the bathroom or in a compromising position 😉
  • Read and use text messages, Facebook posts, contact details, and listen to your phone calls
As technology has increasingly become embedded in our lives (cars, phones, pacemakers, computers), the speed of poisonous software also continues to keep pace. There are principles you can adopt now that apply to ALL your connected devices. In this piece, I highlight one of these below:
Tip #1 (safety):
  •   Never click on a link
Malware is installed in most cases because we humans receive a message (text message, email, instagram message) and click on a link. The link has disguised itself as a legitimate link, but the click allows malware to be installed on your device. From there bad things happen.
Tip #2 (sanity!!):
  •  Backup your data OFF the device
There are many methods, but simply be sure what you care about is saved on another device. This way when malware happens (or loss, theft, or dropping phone into a lake), you can restore the default software and replace your backup onto the device. The only recommended way to recover from a malware event.
If this was helpful to you or your family, please check out the other principles and 63 additional tips by freely exploring How Not To Be Hacked online using Amazon’s ‘peak inside’ feature. Feel free to message me online anytime with questions. Together we can protect our community and enjoy technology safely and securely.
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Is your Chrysler hackable? See below if you are part of recall.. How Not To Be Hacked: Car Edition

Posted on July 27, 2015 in Uncategorized - 0 comments - 0

Jeep_sign

 

 

Over the past week news of security researchers remotely taking over a Chrysler Jeep hit the news. This was written up and demonstrated nicely in the Wired Magazine article. I received many emails about how to prevent yourself from being harmed, and there is good news!

Fiat Chrysler has issued a voluntary safety recall affecting 1.4M vehicles in the US – call your dealership if you are on one of the listed models of cars below.

 

See if your vehicle needs a safety update:

  • 2013-2015 MY Dodge Viper specialty vehicles
  • 2013-2015 Ram 1500, 2500 and 3500 pickups
  • 2013-2015 Ram 3500, 4500, 5500 Chassis Cabs
  • 2014-2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee and Cherokee SUVs
  • 2014-2015 Dodge Durango SUVs
  • 2015 MY Chrysler 200, Chrysler 300 and Dodge Charger sedans
  • 2015 Dodge Challenger sports coupes

– Source: BBC

More details to follow as other manufacturers and models will certainly need attention as ‘connected’ motorized vehicles catch up to network security research scrutiny.

Title is a play on the research for How Not To Be Hacked. A giveaway for books is also underway at Amazon – free to everyone!

James DeLuccia

Photo credit: ANDY GREENBERG/WIRED

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How Criminals stole $50M in tax returns, and how this will happen again

Posted on June 1, 2015 in hntbh - 0 comments - 0

This week there was a lot of media attention on how Criminals accessed over a 100,000 U.S. Citizen tax returns, and then used this in a successful attack to file requests for tax refunds totaling over $50,000,000. If you were a victim of this, please immediately begin working with the iRS to secure your tax returns (you can activate a two-factor type authentication to prevent these attacks in the future).

It is important to know – the IRS WAS NOT HACKED. The criminals used data gathered from other data breaches and public information to trick the IRS system into thinking they were you. This is a principle raised in the book, once your data is breached it is ALWAYS breached. So, 12 months of monitoring or short term protection won’t suffice.

If you have the book (release is first weeks of June!!!), please visit the last two chapters that cover recovery. These will give you great protections and assurances.

Here is how the IRS was attacked, and no it is not complicated. In fact, we will see these types of “attacks” against many institutions relying on such information for authentication:

process_flow_irs_attack

Ask questions on www.facebook.com/hntbh

Best,

James

*Credits to Van Gogh for the image, and Privacy Rights for the stats on last year’s data breaches.

 

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Bored w/ Security warnings? You are not alone – MRIs show our brains shutting down when we see security prompts

Posted on March 30, 2015 in hntbh - 0 comments - 0

Anderson, et al imageEver find yourself just click click clicking through every message box that pops up? Most people click through a warning (which in the land of Web Browsers usually means STOP DON’T GO THERE!!) in less than 2 seconds. The facts seem to be due to be from habituation – basically, you are used to clicking, and now we have the brain scans to prove it!

What does this mean for you? Well specifically you won’t be able to re-wire your brain, but perhaps you can turn up the settings on your web browser to not allow you to connect to a site that has the issues your web browser is warning against. Simple – let the browser deal with it and take away one nuisance.

From the study:

The MRI images show a “precipitous drop” in visual processing after even one repeated exposure to a standard security warning and a “large overall drop” after 13 of them. Previously, such warning fatigue has been observed only indirectly, such as one study finding that only 14 percent of participants recognized content changes to confirmation dialog boxes or another that recorded users clicking through one-half of all SSL warnings in less than two seconds.

via MRIs show our brains shutting down when we see security prompts | Ars Technica. (photo credit Anderson, et al)

Don’t forget to check out – www.facebook.com/hntbh if you are looking for quick reminders. The book is coming along and chapter releases are (finally) coming in April!

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