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How Criminals stole $50M in tax returns, and how this will happen again

Posted on June 1, 2015 in hntbh - 0 comments - 0

This week there was a lot of media attention on how Criminals accessed over a 100,000 U.S. Citizen tax returns, and then used this in a successful attack to file requests for tax refunds totaling over $50,000,000. If you were a victim of this, please immediately begin working with the iRS to secure your tax returns (you can activate a two-factor type authentication to prevent these attacks in the future).

It is important to know – the IRS WAS NOT HACKED. The criminals used data gathered from other data breaches and public information to trick the IRS system into thinking they were you. This is a principle raised in the book, once your data is breached it is ALWAYS breached. So, 12 months of monitoring or short term protection won’t suffice.

If you have the book (release is first weeks of June!!!), please visit the last two chapters that cover recovery. These will give you great protections and assurances.

Here is how the IRS was attacked, and no it is not complicated. In fact, we will see these types of “attacks” against many institutions relying on such information for authentication:

process_flow_irs_attack

Ask questions on www.facebook.com/hntbh

Best,

James

*Credits to Van Gogh for the image, and Privacy Rights for the stats on last year’s data breaches.

 

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Home Depot and JP Morgan were hacked, so YOU need to take action

Posted on September 3, 2014 in hntbh - 0 comments - 0

The news in the past few weeks has included several online businesses (Apple), a leader in finance (JP Morgan), and a retailer (Home Depot). The attacks varied, the exposure of specific data unique, and the customer type certainly unrelated. Despite these realities, every one of these businesses has one thing in common – YOUR information, money, and details were exposed.

Why is this important?

  • Thieves could empty bank accounts
  • Thieves could use the stolen information and trick YOU to log on to a fake JP Morgan website (this was actually done in this case days before the attack was made public)

You must take the following action:

  1. Change your passwords (for any call in verifications and or online)
  2. Print your account statements and keep a detailed record of your $$ at the bank(s)
  3. If your retailer confirms a breach, request a new Credit/Debit Card w/ fresh fraud prevention safeguards

Responding to the ebb and flow of data breaches is impossible, but if together we establish behaviors to counter the negative effects then we have succeeded.

Be safe,

James

*on the book front I am making progress and aim to release a chapter sketch soon. a challenge I have currently is financing the graphic artists and editors necessary to create a really stunning book. any ideas are welcomed!

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